Aston Martin AMR-One Le Mans Prototype flips its lid

 

Aston Martin’s new 2011 Le Mans Prototype flips the script on its predecessor. The LMP1 car fielded by Aston Martin Racing for the last two years was a modified Lola coupe powered by a competition version of the 6.0-liter V12 that propels most Aston road cars. Despite being the fastest non-diesel P1 of the past two seasons, it couldn’t compete with the Audi R15 and Peugeot 908.

While Audi has switched to a closed cockpit for its new R18, the AMR-One does away with its roof to make driver changes quicker. The aerodynamic hit is balanced by speed in the pits. The carbon-fiber chassis of the AMR-One has been developed in-house by Aston Martin rather than use off-the-shelf Lola parts. Like the new Audi and Peugeot racers, Aston Martin has opted for 18-inch wheels all around which is expected to provide better balance. Despite the rear-mid-engine layout and the now-mandatory shark fin on the back, the flat sides of the AMR-One mean that it most closely resembles the front-engine Panoz LMP1 Roadster of 1999.

2011 P1 rules  limit non-diesel normally aspirated engines to 3.4-liters  and boosted engines to 2.0-liters.  Aston engineers have created a brand-new 2.0-liter turbocharged inline-six-cylinder that cranks out an estimated 540 horsepower. Power is fed to the rear wheels via an Xtrac six-speed semi-automatic gearbox with a pneumatic shift mechanism.

Aston Martin is planning to build six examples of the AMR-One but they won’t be ready to race at the ALMS/Intercontinental Le Mans Cup season opener at Sebring this month. Aston hasn’t said if they will run a Lola at Sebring although the Cytosport team will be campaigning one of the Lolas in Florida and throughout the rest of the year. Aston does plan to run a car in the rest of the ILMC races and two cars at Le Mans in June.

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